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Many Uses for Marjoram Essential Oil

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Sweet Marjoram Essential Oil is indigenous to the Mediterranean region: Egypt, Tunisia, and Morocco. It was known to the Greeks and Romans as a symbol of happiness. The ancient Greeks used marjoram in cosmetics, fragrances and medicines; Greek physicians also used it as an antidote to poison. In 16th century Europe, sweet marjoram was used in bags to scent the bath water and for washing. In Egypt, it was known for its healing properties and was also anciently used to aid grieving.

dōTERRA sources its sweet Marjoram Essential Oil from Egypt. Many use marjoram for alleviating migraines, arthritis, headaches, respiratory infections, sinusitis, insomnia, anxiety, nervous depression, asthma, bronchitis, colds, constipation, flatulence, grief, menstrual difficulties (including PMT) and stress.

Other Uses of Marjoram

Sweet marjoram oil is also used as a fragrance ingredient in perfumes, cosmetics, soaps and detergents; it is also found in meats, sauces, and seasonings.

Culinary Uses of Marjoram

When cooking with marjoram essential oil, remember that doTERRA oils are in their purest form, which makes them very concentrated. Only a tiny amount is needed to flavor meats, sauces, or seasonings. When substituting marjoram essential oil for the dried or fresh herb, begin with the toothpick method. Dip a toothpick in the oil and swirl into the sauce until the desired taste is achieved. For larger quantities, one drop of the oil will add plenty of flavor.

Recent News about Marjoram

A recently published article in Martha Stewart’s Whole Living refers to Marjoram Essential Oil’s ability to treat eczema. Eczema is a chronic, inflammatory skin disorder. Although eczema is not contagious, it is very common—estimates are that more than 15 million people in the United States have eczema. One clinical study evaluating essential oils for treating children with eczema concluded that massage with essential oils was effective in improving the dry, scaly skin lesions. The essential oils most often chosen by the mothers in the study included sweet marjoram, frankincense, German chamomile, myrrh, thyme, benzoin, spike lavender, and Litsea cubeba.

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